Birds at the golf course

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Loggerhead Shrike.

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I took a walk past the Ocean Club Golf Course at the Hutchinson Island Marriott yesterday morning. Photos could be better, since most of the birds were on the wrong side of the light and far away.

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This is the most interesting bird. These shrikes don’t live in NH, where I started watching birds, and I’ve only seen a couple them in Florida.

Audubon Field Guide: Loggerhead Shrike

In open terrain, this predatory songbird watches from a wire or other high perch, then pounces on its prey: often a large insect, sometimes a small bird or a rodent. The Loggerhead is gradually disappearing from many areas, for reasons that are poorly understood.

Forages mostly by watching from an exposed perch, then swooping down to take prey on or near ground or from low vegetation. Kills its prey using its hooked bill. Often stores uneaten prey by impaling it on thorn or barbed wire, returning to eat it later.

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Wikipedia: Shrike…

Shrikes (/ʃraɪk/) are carnivorous passerine birds of the family Laniidae. The family is composed of thirty-one species in four genera. They are fairly closely related to the bush-shrike family Malaconotidae.

The family name, and that of the largest genus, Lanius, is derived from the Latin word for “butcher”, and some shrikes are also known as butcherbirds because of their feeding habits. The common English name shrikeis from Old English scrīc, alluding to the shrike’s shriek-like call.

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In a tree near the pond, an Osprey was dining on a freshly caught and still wriggling fish.

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So many Ospreys around here. I like to watch these big, beautiful fish hawks.

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Northern Mockingbird, Mimus polyglottus, is the only mockingbird commonly found in North America.

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Wikipedia: Northern Mockingbird

The northern mockingbird is known for its intelligence. A 2009 study showed that the bird was able to recognize individual humans, particularly noting those who had previously been intruders or threats. Also birds recognize their breeding spots and return to areas in which they had greatest success in previous years. Urban birds are more likely to demonstrate this behavior. Finally, the mockingbird is influential in United States culture, being the state bird of five states, appearing in book titles, songs and lullabies, and making other appearances in popular culture.

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I spotted a pair of Mottled Ducks. This one with a yellow bill is the male. Female has an orange bill.

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Palm Warbler, I do believe. They never seem to be in palm trees.

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Snowy Egret.

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This Belted Kingfisher was swooping around noisily over the pond, but I captured it in a rare moment of perching.

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Back home we had some interesting “birds” overhead. A couple of F-18s were looping around over Sewall’s Point. The Stuart Airshow is this weekend!

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The McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet is a twin-engine supersonic, all-weather carrier-capable multirole combat jet, designed as both a fighter and attack aircraft (hence the F/A designation). Designed by McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) and Northrop, the F/A-18 was derived from the latter’s YF-17 in the 1970s for use by the United States Navy and Marine Corps. The Hornet is also used by the air forces of several other nations and, since 1986, by the U.S. Navy’s Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels.

I had help identifying these birds from my husband, who is an airline pilot and flew a variety of fighter jets in the Marine Corps.

 

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As the F-18s took a couple of turns overhead, an Osprey was perched atop our Norfolk Island pine.

The ibis good life

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Morning walk yesterday and some White Ibis were still roosting from the night before. Lazy late risers!

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White Ibis is reading the Sunday paper and sipping coffee in bed.

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Moon and bird.

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As I type this on Monday morning, we are an hour and a half past the Spring Equinox so it’s officially SPRING.

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Across the street, more roosting ibises.

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A few blocks away, White ibises were coming down from their roosts and hitting the lawns. Lots of them.

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Breakfast time.

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Northern Mockingbird in a sunny spot.

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I met a boy walking a big Great Dane. He said, “There are a lot of birds around. I can hear more birds this morning than usual.”

“It’s spring!” I said.

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Another block or two and another flock of White Ibis having breakfast. Wish I had counted my grand total of Sunday morning Sewall’s Point White Ibis.

Mockingbird in bittersweet

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Northern Mockingbird in bittersweet.

I saw this bird near the intersection of Willow Ave and Ocean Blvd in the Little Boars Head area of North Hampton. I walked there yesterday afternoon after searching for the Prothonotary Warbler again, with no luck.

Here’s a photo from near the end of the walk, as I returned along Ocean Blvd.

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Yes, it appears to be getting dark at 3:24 p.m.

Just down around the bend in the road was where I saw the rare warbler. I can’t imagine why it would hang around, but I will probably go look for it again today.

Mockingbird and marsh

Northern Mockingbird Depot Road

A study in grays and browns. Northern Mockingbird at marsh edge, off Depot Road in Hampton Falls.

Mimus polyglottos 

These slender-bodied gray birds apparently pour all their color into their personalities. They sing almost endlessly, even sometimes at night, and they flagrantly harass birds that intrude on their territories, flying slowly around them or prancing toward them, legs extended, flaunting their bright white wing patches.

The snow is melted off the old railroad bed that runs through the Hampton Marsh, a favorite spot of mine for walking and bird watching in spring and late fall. A bit thick with poison ivy in summer.

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Depot Road is one way to access the Hampton-Seabrook Estuary, which has been named an Important Bird Area.

NH Audubon: About New Hampshire’s Important Bird Area Program

It was windy yesterday and I will return soon on a balmier day. There were 50 or so crows messing around in the marsh, several small shorebirds that may have been greater or lesser yellowlegs, and one stately great egret in breeding plumage – pure white with neon green around its eyes.