Mangroves in the morning

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I walked into the mangroves behind the Henry Sewall house this morning.

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A boardwalk begins in back of the historic home which was formerly located near the the southern end of Sewall’s Point and is now at the edge of brackish wetlands in Indian Riverside Park in Jensen Beach.

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As I walked past, I peaked into the screened porch and imagined the days before air conditioning.

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Humid and warm, it’s still the wet season here in South Florida. You will perspire walking even slowly through the breezeless mangroves.

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But if you are stealthy and lucky you may sneak up on a few creatures, like this Tricolored Heron.

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There is a sign back there that explains the origin of these particular mangroves.

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Formerly fresh, now salt, but still a quiet place for birds, fish and animals near a busy road and in a busy park .

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I spy with my little eye…

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Something with a big eye… a Black-crowned Night Heron in a patch of sunlight.

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All About Birds…

Black-crowned Night-Herons are common in wetlands across North America—you just may have to look a little harder than you do for most herons. True to their name, these birds do most of their feeding at night and spend much of the day hunched among leaves and branches at the water’s edge. Evening and dusk are good times to look for these rather stout, short-necked herons flying out to foraging grounds.

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Sunday morning is for loafing.

 

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