Warblers are passing through

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Mixed flocks of migrating warblers graced us with their presence these past few days.

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It was easy to learn this one a few years ago: American Redstart, so boldly black and orange.

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This Black-throated Blue Warbler isn’t too hard to see because it visits lower shrubbery down near eye level.

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Northern Parula was curious and stayed right in a neighbor’s tree while I shot a few pics.

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I heard this bird before I saw it. Its song is a “rising buzzy trill with a final sharp note”.

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All the warblers in this post are males, easier to spot because of colors and sounds.

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Cornell …

The key to finding a Northern Parula during the breeding season is to look for forests draped with long, wispy plants like Spanish moss and “old man’s beard.” Northern Parulas tend to stick to the canopy, which means you may end up with a bit of “warbler neck.” Luckily during migration they also forage lower in the forest giving your neck a break. Parulas sing a lot during migration—so listen up for their distinctive buzzy trill.

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Cape May Warbler. I’ve seen them before but needed an ID doublecheck from What’s This Bird. I guess I haven’t gotten this bird into long-term memory yet. That’s one negative to my method of taking a bunch of photos then IDing the birds using online sources.

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Must learn my warblers.

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Looking up at a warbler… butt.

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The Cape May Warbler breeds across the boreal forest of Canada and the northern United States, where the fortunes of its populations are largely tied to the availability of spruce budworms, its preferred food. Striking in appearance but poorly understood, the species spends its winters in the West Indies, collecting nectar with its unique curled, semitubular tongue.

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These four species of warblers I managed to photograph for this post all winter in the Caribbean. I wonder if they traveled together the whole way?

Audubon.org: Flyways of the Americas. The Black-throated Blue Warbler is featured for the Atlantic Flyway.

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