Monthly Archives: February 2019

A new warbler

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Catching up with Costa Rica photos!

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There’s that volcano, out there somewhere.

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Raccoon-like coatis just off the deck at Arenal Observatory Lodge.

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Chestnut-sided Warblers were in town for the winter.

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A common bird of second growth and scrubby forests, the Chestnut-sided Warbler is distinctive in appearance. No other warbler combines a greenish-yellow cap, a white breast, and reddish streaks down the sides.

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Capuchin monkey overhead.

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The volcano was recently active.

Two more new birds

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Melodious Blackbirds at the fruit feeder trees at Arenal Observatory Lodge.

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The Melodious Blackbird is a rather unique and vociferous all black icterid of Mexico and Central America. It has a relatively thick and long bill, but most noticeable is that the legs and feet look a size too big on this mid-sized blackbird.

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Arenal Volcano stayed hidden behind clouds during our visit.

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Inside an observation tower we found a small, strikingly-colored bird resting on the floor. It may have flown in an open window and hit another window or couldn’t find its way out. It seemed fine. And what a great close up look!

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Figured out later it was a Green Honeycreeper.

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Very attractive small tanager of humid tropical lowlands. Found in humid evergreen forest edges, plantations, and gardens; at times with mixed-species feeding flocks of honeycreepers and euphonias. Often in pairs, feeding at all levels in fruiting trees and bushes. Note the short, curved bill. Males are a unique green-blue color with black hood and a banana yellow beak. Female resembles female Red-legged Honeycreeper but is larger, brighter, uniform green, with yellow lower bill and grayish legs.

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Tiny little thing. It made it out the window and away into the tropical forest before we left.

Golden-hooded Tanagers

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More Costa Rica birds from our trip in January.

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We were at the Arenal Observatory Lodge when we spotted these Golden-hooded Tanagers.

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The Golden-hooded Tanager (Tangara larvata) is a neotropical species that inhabits humid forest and forest edges.

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Gorgeous colors on this petite banana-eater!

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The tanagers comprise the bird family Thraupidae, in the order Passeriformes. The family has an American distribution. The Thraupidae are the second-largest family of birds and represent about 4% of all avian species and 12% of the Neotropical birds.

Amazilia tzacatl

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This little jewel of a bird was in a garden at the Arenal Observatory Lodge, in Costa Rica.

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Rufous-tailed Hummingbirds were all over and easy to see, as they are bold and territorial.

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The food of this species is nectar, taken from a variety of flowers, including Heliconias and bananas. Like other hummingbirds, it also takes small insects as an essential source of protein. Rufous-tailed hummingbirds are very aggressive, and defend flowers and shrubs in their feeding territories. They are dominant over most other hummingbirds.