Bird + paradise

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Northern Cardinal on a white/ giant bird of paradise flower.

The flower is named for the bird it resembles.

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Eating seeds?

There are a lot of cardinals living here in Sewall’s Point.

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I watched this cardinal on River Road this morning while out for a walk with my camera and a wide-brimmed hat. It’s hot and sunny!

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UV index is 12 today… on a scale of 1 to 10!

Sing it

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Little bird with a big voice. Here’s a video of a Carolina Wren Song.

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There were a couple in the backyard the other evening, flying short distances between fences and ground.

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Fluffy. They are such a beautiful warm brown color.

Pretty in pink

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Spoonbills at Bird Island a couple of weekends ago.

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Are they courting?

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Audubon.org Roseate Spoonbill:

In courtship, male and female first interact aggressively, later perch close together, present sticks to each other, cross and clasp bills.

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So pink!

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Very common in parts of the southeast until the 1860s, spoonbills were virtually eliminated from the United States as a side-effect of the destruction of wader colonies by plume hunters. Began to re-colonize Texas and Florida early in 20th century. Still uncommon and local, vulnerable to degradation of feeding and nesting habitats.

Wren again

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Carolina wren in the bottlebrush tree right in front of our living room window.

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After perching for a couple of minutes, he flew up into the gutters and scuffed around for dinner.

Cornell Lab of Ornithology:

Insects and spiders make up the bulk of this wren’s diet. Common foods include caterpillars, moths, stick bugs, leafhoppers, beetles, grasshoppers, crickets, and cockroaches. Carolina Wrens occasionally eat lizards, frogs, or snakes. They also consume a small amount of plant matter, such as fruit pulp and seeds from bayberry, sweetgum, or poison ivy.

Red-startled

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It thunderstormed and rained hard yesterday as a cool front passed through and after the rain, surprise! there were warblers. Especially noticeable were the American Redstarts flitting around, including this male I photographed across the street.

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Female American Redstart.

American Redstarts are incredibly active insectivores that seem never to stand still. They rapidly spread their cocked tails, exposing the orange or yellow in a quick flash, which often startles insect prey into flushing, whereupon the redstart darts after it, attempting to catch it in the air.

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Bonus photo, flowers!

Plumeria aka frangipani is in bloom. It’s the Hawaiian lei flower.