April showers bring… ducks

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It rained and rained on Sunday and the drainage swale at the end of our street was a little pond on Monday.

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A pair of Mottled Ducks was happy about that.

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Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission…

Because the plumage of male and female mottled ducks is similar, the easiest way to tell them apart is by bill color. The male mottled duck has an olive green to yellow bill whereas the female has an orange to brown bill with dark blotches or dots.

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The female is keeping an eye on the skies.

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The Florida mottled duck, often called the Florida duck or Florida mallard, is a unique subspecies found only in peninsular Florida. This nonmigratory duck spends its entire life within the state’s brackish and freshwater marshes, ponds, lakes, rivers, canals, ditches, and mosquito impoundments on the east and west coasts and inland. Approximately 40 percent of the mottled duck’s diet consists of insects, snails, mollusks, crayfish and small fish. The remainder of its diet is composed of grass seeds, stems, and roots; seeds of other marsh plants; and bayberries.

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Bonus, on the walk back up the street I got a photo of a zebra longwing, Heliconius charithonia. Did a bird take a bite of this one?

The adult butterflies are unusual in feeding on pollen as well as on nectar; the pollen enables them to synthesize cyanogenic glycosides that make their bodies toxic to potential predators. Caterpillars feed on various species of passionflower, evading the plants’ defensive trichomes by biting them off or laying silk mats over them.

They are the state butterfly of Florida.

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